I've dreamt in my life dreams that have stayed with me ever after, and changed my ideas: they've gone through and through me, like wine through water, and altered the color of my mind.
Emily Bronte
Wuthering Heights

donderdag 21 augustus 2014

Emily' s christening mug

Bronte Parsonage Museum
Emily Jane Brontë was baptised on 20-08-1818. She was the only member of the family to have a middle name, and her christening mug can be seen below.

 

woensdag 20 augustus 2014

Carne & Carne bank

The Batten, Carne & Carne bank was the result of the amalgamation of two major Penzance family interests. The Carne part owed its existence to local grocer and merchant, William Carne, who opened the Penzance Bank in 1797, with associates Batten and Oxnam at 15, Chapel Street.
                    
The Battens were an old and well respected Penzance trading family that had given several mayors to the borough from its ranks. In 1823 William's famous son, Joseph Carne, joined the partners of the bank to give it the name it was to have for the next 73 years.

For two score years he was one of the chief movers and shakers in Penzance society, being involved in both the formation of the Penzance library and geological society, as well as writing several learned papers on mineralogy, mining and natural history. He lived with two of his four daughters, Caroline and Elizabeth, in the large end house on the east side of Chapel Street opposite St Mary's Church.

When his father, William, died in 1836 there was an enormous turn-out of people for the funeral service. Upon Joseph's death in 1858 his daughter, Elizabeth Carne, a highly respected woman in her own right, became a partner in the running of the bank, his four sons having followed different callings. It was during Elizabeth's time on the Board that an impressive new building was constructed in Market Place and the bank moved there in 1864 (today's William Rogers Insurance). But it was a move overshadowed by the death of 20-year-old Archibald Ross-Carne who joined the partners of the bank two years before and lived with his aunts Caroline and Elizabeth Carne before succumbing to scarlet fever.

When the esteemed Elizabeth Carne died in 1873, the bank was still seen as a rock solid business in which to save and invest, and secure loans.

Read more: Fall-house-Carne/story

 

CARNE, ELIZABETH. Cousin of the Bronte Sisters (from Mothers side)

CARNE, ELIZABETH CATHERINE THOMAS (1817–1873), author, fifth daughter of Joseph Carne, F.R.S. [q. v.], was born at Rivière House, in the parish of Phillack, Cornwall, on 16 Dec. 1817, and baptised in Phillack church on 15 May 1820. On her father's death in 1858, having come into an ample fortune, she spent considerable sums in charitable purposes, gave the site for the Elizabeth or St. Paul's schools which were opened at Penzance on 2 Feb. 1876, founded schools at Wesley Rock, Carfury, and Bosullow, three thinly populated districts in the neighbourhood of Penzance, and built a museum in which to exhibit to the public a fine collection of minerals which she had inherited from her parent. She was the head of the Penzance bank from 1858 to her decease. She inherited her father's love of geology, and wrote four papers in the ‘Transactions of the Royal Geological Society of Cornwall:’ ‘Cliff Boulders and the Former Condition of the Land and Sea in the Land's End district,’ ‘The Age of the Maritime Alps surrounding Mentone,’ ‘On the Transition and Metamorphosis of Rocks,’ and ‘On the Nature of the Forces that have acted on the Formation of the Land's End Granite.’ Many articles were contributed by her to the ‘London Quarterly Review,’ and she was the author of several books. She died at Penzance on 7 Sept. 1873, and was buried at Phillack on 12 Sept. Her funeral sermon was preached in St. Mary's Church, Penzance, by the Rev. Prebendary Hedgeland on 14 Sept. She was the author of: 1. ‘Three Months' Rest at Pau in the Winter and Spring of 1859,’ brought out with the pseudonym of John Altrayd Wittitterly in 1860. 2. ‘Country Towns and the place they fill in Modern Civilisation,’ 1868. 3. ‘England's Three Wants,’ an anonymous book, 1871. 4. ‘The Realm of Truth,’ 1873.Carne,_Elizabeth

19th-century-hypatia-elizabeth-catherine-thomas-carne-1817-1873/

woensdag 13 augustus 2014

Joseph and Elizabeth Carne (contemporary and second cousin of the Bronte sisters)

The generally accepted story in Cornwall is that this large and important collection of some 9000 Cornish minerals made by Joseph Carne (1782-1858) and his daughter Elizabeth, who was also a keen collector, had been given to the Sedgwick Museum by Elizabeth Carne. The donation was thought to have taken place, after her offer to give the collection to the Royal Geological Society of Cornwall had been ‘spurned’ by the Society. The Dictionary of National Biography entry on Elizabeth Carne just says that the collection ‘went to the Sedgwick Museum’. The link with the famous Bronte siblings (Maria, Elizabeth, Charlotte, Emily, Anne and Branwell), is that Elizabeth Carne (1817-1873) was their contemporary and second cousin.

Joseph Carne, eldest son of a Cornish banker, was a self-taught geologist and mineralogist who made detailed investigations of the rocks and minerals of Cornwall and was appointed manager of the Cornish Copper Company’s works at Hayle in 1807. Although the Wikipedia entry on Carne claims that his published works prompted the eminent German geologist Abraham Gottlieb Werner (1749-1817) to travel to Cornwall, I can find no reference which backs up this claim. On the contrary, it is generally stated that Werner never traveled beyond his native Saxony.
During his professional life Carne amassed a unique collection of Cornish minerals, especially rare ore minerals. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1818, was an honorary member of the Cambridge Philosophical Society and an active member of the Royal Geological Society of Cornwall, which is the second oldest geological society in the world and the only one to have royal patronage. In 1820 Carne became a partner in the family bank of Batten, Carne & Carne. Upon his death in 1858, the eighth of his nine children, Elizabeth inherited £20,000, his mineral collection, the family house and his partnership in the bank. She also took her geology and natural history seriously, visiting Europe and authored books and published papers for the Transactions of the Royal Geological Society of Cornwall and the London Quarterly Review.camunivmuseums

Elizabeth Carne made a number of visits to places in Europe, including Pau (described in her book, Three Months Rest at Pau in the Winter and Spring of 1859) and Menton, where she examined parts of the geology of the French Alps, later described in her paper ‘Enquiry into the age of that part of the district of the Maritime Alps which surrounds Mentone’, Transactions of the Royal Geological Society of Cornwall 7 (1865) 433–41. She also wrote three more papers for the society, published in its Transactions: two continued her father’s work on granites and raised beaches, and a third was on the metamorphic rocks of Cornwall. She was also the author of a number of books and many papers for the London Quarterly Review (some under the pseudonym John Altrayd Wittitterly). She died at 6 Coulson’s Terrace, Penzance, of typhoid fever, on 7 September 1873, and was buried on 12 September at Phillack churchyard.  elizabeth-carne
women-in-cambridge-geology

Family Branwell

Maria Branwell, who, at Guiseley, on December 29th, 1812, became the wife of the Reverend Patrick Brontë, was the daughter of Thomas Branwell and Ann Carne, his wife, both natives of Penance.

The Branwells resided in that neighbourhood for two centuries before Thomas Branwell's day, and their name, under the various guises of Bramwell, Bramble and Bromwell, is to be found in the registers of the parishes adjoining Penzance.  The earliest mention of this name that I can trace in Cornwall occurs in the Parish of Sancreed in 1605. A former incumbent of the adjoining parish of Paul, John Trernearne, saw his church in the hands of the Spaniards in 1595, when four of their warships made a raid on the Cornish coast. From him was descended Jane Tremearne, who, on July 2nd, 1705, married Martyn Bremble, presumably the son of John Bromwell, whose marriage to Constance is recorded on March 13th, 1657-8, at Madron. Martyn Branwell's will, dated April 22nd, 1719, and proved July 29th, 1719, exists at the Probate Registry at Bodmin. He is described as of Penzance, and a butcher by trade; and he mentions his sons, Martyn, Richard, and Joseph, and three daughters, Maudlyn, Margery, and Alice. To his wife, Jane he bequeathed the fee simple of the house and gardens, etc., wherein he dwelt, and also another house. From the terms of his will it is evident that Richard, Joseph, Margery, and Alice were minors. Of these children, Richard, baptised at Madron Church (the mother church of Penzance), on February 26th, 1711, is of greater importance in our special quest than the others. He married in 1742, at the same church, Margaret John, daughter of Thomas John, blacksmith of Penzance, and by her was the father of four sons and four daughters. Of these sons, two, named Martin, died young; the other two were Richard, the eldest child, from whom descended the Branwells resident at Penzance today, and Thomas, the father of Maria Brontë.  Of the four daughters, Margaret, the eldest, married Joseph Coren in 1772, and by him had a son, also named Joseph, described as a scrivener in his grandfather's will, dated February 9th, 1792. The next daughter, Elizabeth, married John Keam, who is described as a shop-keeper. In The Wesleyan Magazine for 1826 (page 68), there is an obituary notice of this worthy by the Rev. Wm. Pennington Burgess. Therein it is stated that he died in the sixty-eighth year of his age, and that for thirty-six years, "he had been a steady and upright member of the Methodist Society, and was generally respected and esteemed." Alice, the younger daughter, married John Williams, gentleman, of Redruth. I have not been able to ascertain anything concerning the descendants of these three daughters, Mrs. Keam, Mrs. Coren, and Mrs. Williams.  With Jane, the third daughter of Richard Branwell and Margaret John, the case is different. She married, at Madron in December, 1790, John Fennell, a schoolmaster, some nine years younger than herself. When, in the early part of 1812, Mr. Fennell was appointed to the headmastership of the residential school for the children of Wesleyans at Woodhouse Grove, at its inauguration, Mrs. Fennell became the matron of the establishment. She died at Crosstones Vicarage, near Todmorden, well past the Psalmist's span of life. On the tombstone in the churchyard, besides the date of her death on May 26th, 1829, are the following lines, a loving tribute from her husband:

Farewell, blest saint, thou dear and faithful friend,
Beloved in life, lamented in thine end,
Instructed long in sharp affliction's school
To make submission to thy lord thy rule,
To find, when every hope of life was past,
Thy blest, thy choicest comforts, were thy last.
Thou now eternally with him shall dwell,
Blest saint, thou dear and faithful friend, farewell.
 
John Fennell was the son of Thomas Fennell and Mary, his wife, of Madeley in Shropshire, and was born in 1762. In 1801, there appeared in The Wesleyan Methodist Magazine two short letters from his pen. In one he discusses the character of the Rev. John Fletcher, of Madeley, and appends a letter received by him from that saintly man. One gathers from it that Fennell was a godson of Mr. Fletcher, who was an intimate friend of John Wesley. The second communication is an account of the death of Susanna Taylor, of Penzance, on January 10th, 1801. The death of this young lady of only 19 summers is affectingly described, and the lessons derivable from her good life are laid down for those who desired a pattern of piety.  From these it is evident that Mr. Fennell was a class-leader amongst the Wesleyans of Penzance. In 1796, and in later years, he contributed replies to Mathematical questions in The Ladies' Diary. He was never a fully fledged Methodist Minister, though in The Dictionary of National Biography, he is described as such. It was his head-ship of Woodhouse Grove School - a post, since his time, held chiefly by Wesleyan Ministers - which has led to the false conception that he was an itinerant Minister among the Methodists. He was at Woodhouse only some ten or eleven months, but in that short period he was the means of bringing together the two people who were afterwards to become the parents of the gifted Brontë sisters.  The story of the meeting of the Irish Curate and the little Cornish lady has been told many times over since Mrs. Gaskell, in her classic, related it for the first time. It would seem that Mrs. Fennell needed help in the needlework department of the establishment, and, as Miss Maria Branwell was an expert at sewing, and was on the lookout for some method of supplementing her little fortune, she accepted the proffered post, and after a tedious journey north, was duly installed. Shortly after Mr. Fennell left Woodhouse Grove, he took Holy Orders, and for some time served as a Curate to the Rev. John Crosse, the blind and pious Vicar of Bradford. We first find Fennell's signature as Curate in the Bradford Parish Registers on October 15th, 1815, the very day that Christ Church was consecrated, and to which his predecessor and son-in-law, William Morgan, had been appointed as incumbent. His last signature appears on April 13th, 1817.  A great friendship, based on their mutual belief in Evangelical theology, existed between Vicar Crosse and John Fennell. When the Vicar died, Fennell came over from Crosstones, and preached the funeral sermon, which was afterwards printed. Thanks to Mr. Crosse, who had previously held that incumbency, Mr. Fennell was appointed to Crosstones, near Todmorden, and continued Vicar of that remote and upland hamlet until his death in October 1847 (amended to 1841) at the age of 79. By his first wife, of whom we have spoken, he had but one child, Jane Branwell Fennell, who was baptised (amended to born) at Madron on October 9th, 1791.  As is well known, she was married at Guiseley to the Rev. William Morgan by the Rev. Patrick Brontë, and on the same occasion her husband performed the marriage ceremony for Brontë and his wife, who, of course, was Jane Fennell's cousin. On the very same day, in the far distant church of Madron, Maria Branwell's youngest sister, Charlotte, was married to Joseph Branwell, her own cousin, and, consequently, cousin also to both ladies of the Guiseley marriages. Of William Morgan Vicar of Christ Church, Bradford, much has been written in scattered form, but we yet await the full story of the useful life of this strenuous worker in the cause of religion and temperance. He was of a choleric and irascible temperament, and it was reported of him that on one occasion he sent his cook to jail for making thin sauce!  The Church of Madeley, near Wellington in Shropshire, where Fletcher ministered, should be added to the list of places of Brontëan interest. Fletcher, too, was a friend of John Crosse. Morgan had been a curate at Wellington, and, somewhat later, Patrick Brontë had also held the same office. When Fennell, the god-son of Fletcher, came to live near Bradford, what was more natural than the development of friendships with Crosse, with Morgan, and, through the latter, with Patrick Brontë? The links in the chain of causation of an important marriage are here revealed, and the influence of John Wesley on the Brontë sisters, their lives, and their writings is not so remote as might be imagined.

RICHARD BRANWELL (1711-1792) was baptized at Madron on 26 February 1711. He married around 1742. He married Margaret John at Madron in 1742. "He with his partner Mr Hambleton were the premier builders of Penzance, and built the Assembly Room in the Union Hotel (first assembly 1791), where the gentry (à la Poldark) met monthly to hold their balls. He also built 25 Chapel Street, and put in the Georgian staircase at Godolphin Manor. His work on the quay, however, was washed away, and he was criticized on this account." (correspondence with Lilian Oldham). Richard's will is dated 9 February 1792. He was buried eight days later, in Penzance. Richard and Margaret had eight children:
1 RICHARD BRANWELL (1744-1812), baptized at Madron on 9 July 1744. He married Honour Matthews. He became an innkeeper. He died in Newquay after a lingering illness. His descendants, who continued to live in Penzance, were:
1.1 RICHARD BRANWELL (1772-1815) 1.2 HONOR BRANWELL (1773-before 1776) 1.3 ROBERT MATTHEWS BRANWELL (1775-1813) 1.4 HONOR BRANWELL (1777-??) 1.5 THOMAS BRANWELL (1778-1811) 1.6 THOMASINE MATTHEWS BRANWELL (1779?-1853) 1.7 MARGARET BRANWELL (1782-1816) 1.8 JULIA BRANWELL (1784-1829) 1.9 ELIZA BRANWELL (1786-1835) 1.10 JOSEPH BRANWELL (1789-1857)
2 THOMAS BRANWELL (1746-1808), baptized at Madron in 1746. He married Ann Carne on 28 November 1768. He died on 5 April 1808. They had eleven children, including:
2.8 MARIA BRANWELL (1783-1821), born on 15 April 1783 and baptized at Madron on 29 June 1788. She was a seamstress, and travelled north to work for John Fennell. On 29 November 1812, she married the Reverend Patrick Brontë at Guiseley. He was some six years older than her. She died on 15 September 1821. Patrick lived on, and died on 7 June 1861. The Brontës, with the exception of Anne, are all buried in the family crypt at Haworth, Yorkshire. They had six children:
2.8.1 MARIA BRONTË (1814-1825), who died, aged 11, on 6 May 1825. 2.8.2 ELIZABETH BRONTË (1815-1825), born on 8 February 1815. She died on 15 June 1825. 2.8.3 CHARLOTTE BRONTË (1816-1855), born at Thornton on 21 April 1816 and baptized on the 29th. She married the Reverend Arthur Bell Nicholls on 29 June 1854. She died during pregnancy on 31 March 1855. Arthur survived, and died on 2 December 1906. 2.8.4 PATRICK BRANWELL BRONTË (1817-1848), born on 26 June 1817. He died on 24 September 1848. 2.8.5 EMILY JANE BRONTË (1818-1848), born on 30 July 1818. She died on 19 December 1848. 2.8.6 ANNE BRONTË (1820-1849), born on 17 January 1820. She died in Scarborough on 28 May 1849.
3 MARGARET BRANWELL (1748-1773), baptized at Madron on 5 December 1748. She married Joseph Corin on 20 April 1772. She died shortly after the birth of their first child, and was buried at Madron on 15 February 1773. 4 ELIZABETH BRANWELL (1750-??), baptized at Madron on 30 June 1750. She married John Keam, a Methodist and a shopkeeper, some nine years younger than herself. 5 MARTIN BRANWELL (1752-1755), baptized at Madron on 18 June 1752. He also died in infancy. 6 JANE BRANWELL (1753-1829), baptized at Madron on 3 December 1853. She married John Fennell at Madron in 1790. He too was some nine years younger than his wife. He was from Madeley, in Shropshire, and came to Penzance to teach. He was a Methodist class-leader, but later became vicar of Crosstones, near Todmorden. Jane died at Crosstones on 26 May 1829. She and John had a daughter:
6.1 JANE BRANWELL FENNELL (1791-1827), born at Madron on 9 October 1791. She married the Reverend William Morgan at Guiseley on 29 November 1812 in a double wedding with her cousin, Maria Branwell. She died at on 24 September 1827, and was buried at Cross-stones three days later.
7 ALICE BRANWELL (1756-??), baptized at Madron on 3 July 1756. She married John Williams, gentleman of Redruth. 8 MARTIN BRANWELL (1761-1761), baptized privately at Madron on 29 June 1761, who also died in infancy. hector.davie/Branwell

 

dinsdag 12 augustus 2014

Branwell Family

pictureAlice BRANWELL  
          Birth: 1780 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
        Baptism: 5 Dec 1780 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
          Death: Oct 1781 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
         Burial: 25 Oct 1781 - Madron, Cornwall, England
  
Parents 
Father: Thomas BRANWELL {3309} (Abt 1746-1808) Mother: Ann CARNE {3310} (Abt 1744-1809)
GENERAL NOTES: BAPTISM: Date: 05-Dec 1780
Parish Or Reg District: Madron
Name: Alice BRAMWELL
Sex: dau
Father Forename: Thomas
Notes: At Penzance.

BURIAL: Date: 25-Oct 1781
Parish Or Reg District: Madron
Name: Alice BRAMWELL

picture

Amelia Josepha BRANWELL 
Individual Information
          Birth: 1820 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
        Baptism: 1 Jan 1821 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
          Death: Jan 1892 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
         Burial: 16 Jan 1892 - Penzance St Mary, Cornwall, England
  
Parents     
Father: Benjamin Carne BRANWELL JP {3318} (1775-1818) Mother: Mary BATTEN {4623} (1777-1851)

GENERAL NOTES: BAPTISM: Date: 01-Jan 1821
Parish Or Reg District: Madron, Penzance Chapelry
Name: Amelia Josephine BRANWELL
Sex: dau
Father Forename: Benjamin Carne
Mother Forename: Mary
Residence: Penzance
Father Rank Profession: gentleman
Notes:

DEATH: Death is recorded in the GRO indexes for the Penzance Registration District in the March quarter of 1892 under reference 5c 205. She is recorded as Amelia Josepha Branwell aged 76.

BURIAL: Date: 16-Jan 1892
Parish Or Reg District: Penzance, St. Mary (Madron Chapelry)
Name: Amelia Josepha BRANWELL
Age: 76
Residence: Under Chapel Yard
Notes: C.
picture

Anne BRANWELL    
Individual Information
          Birth: 1769 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
        Baptism: 19 Apr 1769 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
          Death: May 1792 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
         Burial: 11 May 1792 - Madron, Cornwall, England
  
Parents 
Father: Thomas BRANWELL {3309} (Abt 1746-1808) Mother: Ann CARNE {3310} (Abt 1744-1809)
GENERAL NOTES: BAPTISM: Date: 19-Apr 1769
Parish Or Reg District: Madron
Name: Anne BRAMWELL
Sex: dau
Father Forename: Thomas

Notes: Priv baptism.

MARRIAGE: Died unmarried.

BURIAL: Burial recorded in Madron Burial Registers:
Date: 11-May 1792
Parish Or Reg District: Madron
Name: Anne BRANWELL
picture

Benjamin Carne BRANWELL JP     
Individual Information
          Birth: 1775 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
        Baptism: 25 Mar 1775 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
          Death: Jul 1818 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
         Burial: 27 Jul 1818 - Penzance, Cornwall, England

Parents 
Father: Thomas BRANWELL {3309} (Abt 1746-1808) Mother: Ann CARNE {3310} (Abt 1744-1809)
Spouses and Children
1. *Mary BATTEN {4623} (1777 - Dec 1851) Marriage: 25 Jan 1799 - Madron, Cornwall, England Mar. User ID: 1435 Children: 1. Thomas BRANWELL {8634} (1801-1805) 2. Mary Batten BRANWELL {8633} (1803-      ) 3. Emma BRANWELL {9879} (1804-      ) 4. Benjamin Batten BRANWELL {8632} (1806-1893) 5. John Batten BRANWELL {9880} (1814-      ) 6. Amelia Josepha BRANWELL {9878} (1820-1892)

General:
 GENERAL NOTES: Justice of the Peace. Became Mayor of Penzance.
BAPTISM: Date: 25-Mar 1775
Parish Or Reg District: Madron
Name: Benjamin Carne BRANWELL
Sex: son
Father Forename: Thomas
Mother Forename:
Father Rank Profession:
Notes: At Penzance.
 MARRIAGE: Date: 25-Jan 1799
Parish Or Reg District: Madron
Groom Name: Benjamin Carne BRANWELL
Groom Residence: Town of Penzance
Groom Rank Profession: Gent.
Groom Signed / Marked (S/M): Signed
Groom Father Rank Profession:
Bride Name: Mary BATTEN
Bride Residence: Town of Penzance
Bride Condition: spinster
Bride Signed / Marked (S/M): Signed
Witness 1: J BATTEN
Witness 2: Elizabeth BRANWELL
Other Information: Licence dated January the 24th 1799.
picture
Catherine BRANWELL       Spouses and Children
1. *John EDMUNDS {1863}
   Mar. User ID: 776
------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Charles Henry BRANWELL Individual Information
          Birth: 16 Feb 1830 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
        Baptism: 13 May 1830 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
          Death: 
         Burial: 
 Cause of Death: 
        User ID: 8631
           AFN : 
Parents
         Father: Joseph BRANWELL {1580} (1789-1857) Mother: Charlotte BRANWELL {3316} (1789-1848)

General:
GENERAL NOTES: BAPTISM: Baptism Circuit: Madron &c W-M Circuit
Name: Charles Henry BRANWELL
Sex: son
Father Forename: Joseph
Mother Forename: Charlotte
Residence: Penzance Parish Or Reg District
Father Rank Profession: Schoolmaster
ate: 13-May 1830 
picture
Charlotte BRANWELL       Individual Information
          Birth: 1789 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
        Baptism: 10 Nov 1789 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
          Death: Jun 1848 - Launceston, Cornwall, England
         Burial: Jun 1848
 Cause of Death: 
        User ID: 3316
           AFN : 

Parents     
Father: Thomas BRANWELL {3309} (Abt 1746-1808) Mother: Ann CARNE {3310} (Abt 1744-1809)

Spouses and Children

1. *Joseph BRANWELL {1580} (1789 - 7 Apr 1857)
       Marriage: 29 Dec 1812 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
   Mar. User ID: 1228
                 
       Children:
                1. Joseph BRANWELL {8624} (1813-1819)
                2. Richard BRANWELL {8628} (1815-      )
                3. Thomas Bronte BRANWELL {8625} (1817-      )
                4. Maria BRANWELL {8629} (1820-      )
                5. William BRANWELL {8627} (1823-      )
                6. Charlotte BRANWELL {8630} (1825-      )
                7. George Taylor BRANWELL {9881} (1827-      )
                8. Charles Henry BRANWELL {8631} (1830-      )
                9. Eliza Anne BRANWELL {10744} (1831-      )
                10. John Bedford BRANWELL {10745} (1833-      )

General: GENERAL NOTES: BAPTISM: Date: 10-Nov 1789
Parish Or Reg District: Penzance
Name: Charlotte BRAMWELL
Sex: d/o
Father Forename: Thomas
Father Rank Profession:
MARRIAGE: Date: 29-Dec 1812
Parish Or Reg District: Madron
Groom Name: Joseph BRANWELL
Groom Residence: Parish of Gulval
Groom Condition: bachelor
Groom Rank Profession:
Groom Signed / Marked (S/M): Signed
Groom Father Rank Profession;
Bride Name: Charlotte BRANWELL
Bride Residence; Parish of Madron
Bride Condition: spinster
Bride Signed / Marked (S/M); Signed
Witness 1: Robr. W BRANWELL
Witness 2; Richd BRANWELL
Other Information: Other Witnesses: Elizth Branwell, Grace Thomas, Tob. Read. Licence dated the eleventh day of Decr. 1812.
DEATH: Death is recorded in the GRO indexes for the Launceston Registration District in the June quarter of 1848 under reference 9.89.
BURIAL: Date: 05-Apr 1848
Parish Or Reg District: Launceston, St. Mary Magdalene
Name: Charlotte BRANWELL
Age: 58
Residence: Tamar Terrace
Transcriber Ntes: N means New Burial Ground. 
picture

Charlotte BRANWELL      
Individual Information
          Birth: 23 Feb 1825 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
        Baptism: 26 Jul 1827 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
          
Parents
Father: Joseph BRANWELL {1580} (1789-1857) Mother: Charlotte BRANWELL {3316} (1789-1848)
General: 
GENERAL NOTES: BAPTISM: Baptism Circuit: Penzance, Wesleyan Circuit
Name: Charlotte BRANWELL
Father Forename: Joseph
Mother Forename: Charlotte
Residence: Penzance Parish Or Reg District
Father Rank Profession: School Master
Date: 26-Jul 1827
Age: born 23 Feb 1825

picture

Eliza BRANWELL      
Individual Information
          Birth: 1786 - Madron, Cornwall, England
        Baptism: 5 Jun 1786 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
          Death: 13 Aug 1835 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
         Burial: 16 Aug 1835 - Penzance St Mary, Cornwall, England
 
Parents
Father: Richard BRANWELL {234} (1744-1812) Mother: Honour MATTHEWS {235} (1745-1811)
General:  GENERAL NOTES: BAPTISM: Date: 05-Jun 1786
Parish Or Reg District: Madron
Name: Eliza BRAMWELL
Sex: d/o
Father Forename: Richard
BURIAL: Buried in St Mary's Churchyard, Penzance. Age recorded as 49.
Date: 16-Aug 1835
Parish Or Reg District: Penzance, St. Mary (Madron Chapelry)
Name: Eliza BRANWELL
Age: 49
Residence: Penzance

picture

Eliza Anne BRANWELL       Individual Information
          Birth: 3 Aug 1831 - Launceston, Cornwall, England
        Baptism: 21 Feb 1832 - Launceston, Cornwall, England
          
Parents
Father: Joseph BRANWELL {1580} (1789-1857) Mother: Charlotte BRANWELL {3316} (1789-1848)

General: 
GENERAL NOTES: BAPTISM: Baptism Circuit: Launceston, Wesleyan Methodist
Name: Eliza Anne BRANWELL
Sex: dau
Father Forename: Joseph
Mother Forename: Charlotte
Residence: Parish Or Reg District Launceston
Father Rank Profession: Accountant
Date: 21-Feb 1832
Age: born: 03 Aug 1831

picture

Elizabeth BRANWELL 
Individual Information
          Birth: 1750 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
        Baptism: 30 Jun 1750 - Penzance St Mary, Cornwall, England
          
Parents
Father: Richard BRANWELL {1568} (1711-1792) Mother: Margaret JOHN {1569} (Abt 1711-1791)
Spouses and Children

1. *John KEAM {4613} (1754 -       )
       Marriage: 1 Dec 1788 - Madron, Cornwall, England
   Mar. User ID: 1437
                 
General: 
GENERAL NOTES: BAPTISM: Date: 30-Jun 1750
Parish Or Reg District: Madron
Name: Elizabeth BRAMWELL
Sex: dau
Father Forename: Richard

MARRIAGE: Date: 01-Dec 1788
Parish Or Reg District: Madron
Groom Name: John KEAM
Groom Age:
Groom Residence: Town of Penzance
Groom Condition:
Groom Rank Profession:
Groom Signed / Marked (S/M): Signed
Groom Father Name:
Groom Father Rank Profession:
Bride Name: Elisabeth BRAMWELL
Bride Residence: Town of Penzance
Witness 1: Jane BRANWELL
Witness 2: Willm. WILLIAMS
Other Information: Banns published Novr. 16th, 23rd & 30th 1788
Transcriber Notes: Bride signed Eliza BRANWELL.

picture

Elizabeth BRANWELL 
  

Individual Information

          Birth: 1776 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
        Baptism: 2 Dec 1776 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
          Death: 29 Oct 1842 - Haworth, Yorkshire, England
         Burial: Oct 1842 - Haworth, Yorkshire, England
  
Parents  
 Father: Thomas BRANWELL {3309} (Abt 1746-1808) Mother: Ann CARNE {3310} (Abt 1744-1809)
General: CENSUS INFORMATION: In the 1841 UK Census, she is listed as Elizabeth Branwell, aged 60 (rounded) of independent means and born in Cornwall. She is living with her brother-in-law, two neices and a servant in Parsonage House, Haworth, Yorkshire. (HO 107/1295/6, Folio 41, Page 1).

GENERAL NOTES:
BAPTISM: Date: 02-Dec 1776
Parish Or Reg District: Madron
Name: Elisabeth BRANWELL
Sex: dau
Father Forename: Thomas
Notes: At Penzance.

Was well known at the Haworth Parsonage. She came to Haworth after the death of her sister Maria to help care for her children; she never returned to Cornwall. She taught the remaining Brontes at home, including instruction on needlework and good housekeeping.
DEATH: Death is recorded in the GRO indexes for the Sheffield Registration District in the December quarter of 1842 under reference 22.333.
Plaque in Chapel Street Methodist Chapel, Penzance, reads:
In memory of ELIZABETH BRANWELL born Penzance 1776, died Haworth 1842. A member of Penzance Wesleyan Society, elder sister of MARIA. From 1921 until her death she dedicated herself to the upbringing and welfare of the motherless BRONTE children. This plaque is the gift of the BRONTE Society, Haworth, Yorkshire. Also HUGH BRANWELL 1890 - 1966.
BURIAL: Buried in St Michael and All Angels church in Haworth, West Yorkshire.
 picture
 Elizabeth BRANWELL Individual Information
          Birth: 1772 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
        Baptism: 8 Sep 1772 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
          Death: Feb 1776 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
         Burial: 23 Feb 1776 - Madron, Cornwall, England
 
Parents   
 Father: Thomas BRANWELL {3309} (Abt 1746-1808) Mother: Ann CARNE {3310} (Abt 1744-1809)
General: GENERAL NOTES: BAPTISM: Date: 08-Sep 1772
Parish Or Reg District: Madron
Name: Elizabeth BRAMWELL
Sex: dau
Father Forename: Thomas
Father Rank Profession:
Notes: At Penzance.

BURIAL: Date: 23-Feb 1776
Parish Or Reg District: Madron
Name: Elisabeth BRANWELL
Notes: dau of Thomas
Transcriber Notes: recorded with Thomas. (Brother).

picture Emma BRANWELL      Individual Information

          Birth: 1804 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
        Baptism: 17 Sep 1804 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
           
Parents

         Father: Benjamin Carne BRANWELL JP {3318} (1775-1818)
         Mother: Mary BATTEN {4623} (1777-1851)

General: GENERAL NOTES: BAPTISM: Date: 17-Sep 1804
Parish Or Reg District: Madron
Name: Emma BRANWELL
Sex: d/o
Father Forename: Benjamin

picture
George Taylor BRANWELL Individual Information

          Birth: 13 Nov 1827 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
        Baptism: 13 Dec 1827 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
          
Parents

         Father: Joseph BRANWELL {1580} (1789-1857)
         Mother: Charlotte BRANWELL {3316} (1789-1848)

General: GENERAL NOTES: BAPTISM: Baptism Circuit: Penzance, Wesleyan Circuit
Name: George Taylor BRANWELL
Father Forename: Joseph
Mother Forename: Charlotte
Residence: Penzance Parish Or Reg District
Father Rank Profession: School Master
Date: 13-Dec 1827
Age: Born 13 Nov 1827

picture Honor BRANWELL 
      
Individual Information

          Birth: 1773 - Madron, Cornwall, England
        Baptism: 16 May 1773 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
          Death: Bef 1776
          
Parents

         Father: Richard BRANWELL {234} (1744-1812)
         Mother: Honour MATTHEWS {235} (1745-1811)

General: GENERAL NOTES: BAPTISM: Date: 16-May 1773
Parish Or Reg District: Madron
Name: Honour BRAMWELL
Sex: dau
Father Forename: Richard
Notes: At Penzance.

picture Honor BRANWELL       Individual Information

          Birth: 1777 - Madron, Cornwall, England
        Baptism: 21 Mar 1777 - Penzance St Mary, Cornwall, England
         
Parents

         Father: Richard BRANWELL {234} (1744-1812)
         Mother: Honour MATTHEWS {235} (1745-1811)

Spouses and Children

1. *Matthew CRASTOR {4149}
   
2. SILBY {7182} (       - Bef 1809)      
   

General: GENERAL NOTES: BAPTISM: Date: 21-Mar 1777
Parish Or Reg District: Madron
Name: Honor BRANWELL
Sex: dau
Father Forename: Richard
Notes: At Penzance Chaple.

MARRIAGE: Was twice married.
First marriage: First husband was SILBY.
Second marriage: Date: 05-Feb 1809
Parish Or Reg District: Madron
Groom Name: Matthew CRASTER
Groom Residence: of North Shields in the County of Northumberland
Groom Condition: bachelor
Groom Signed / Marked (S/M): Signed
Groom Father Name:
Groom Father Rank Profession:
Bride Name: Honour SILBY
Bride Residence: Town of Penzance
Bride Condition: widow
Bride Rank Profession:
Bride Signed / Marked (S/M): Signed
Witness 1: Wm HARLE
Witness 2: M WRIGHT
Other Information: Licence dated the 3rd day of January 1809.

picture Jane BRANWELL    Individual Information

          Birth: 1753 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
        Baptism: 3 Dec 1753 - Penzance St Mary, Cornwall, England
          Death: 26 May 1829 - Todmorden, Yorkshire, England
         Burial: 29 May 1829 - Todmorden, Yorkshire, England
 
Parents

         Father: Richard BRANWELL {1568} (1711-1792)
         Mother: Margaret JOHN {1569} (Abt 1711-1791)

Spouses and Children

1. *Rev. John FENNELL {4617} (1762 - Oct 1841)
       Marriage: 13 Dec 1790 - Madron, Cornwall, England
   Mar. User ID: 1436
                 
       Children:
                1. Jane Branwell FENNELL {4618} (1791-      )

General: OCCUPATION: Matron.

GENERAL NOTES:
BAPTISM: Date: 03-Dec 1753
Parish Or Reg District: Madron
Forename: Jane BRAMWELL
Sex: dau
Father Forename; Richard
Notes; At Penzance.
 MARRIAGE: Date: 13-Dec 1790
Parish Or Reg District: Madron
Groom Name: John FENNELL
Groom Residence: Town of Penzance

Groom Signed / Marked (S/M): Signed
Bride Name: Jane BRANWELL
Bride Residence: Town of Penzance
Bride Signed / Marked (S/M): Signed
Banns / Licence (B/L): Banns
Witness 1: Richd. (Junr.) BRANWELL
Witness 2: Jane SUTHERLAND
Other Information: Other Witness: Alice Branwell. Banns published Novr. 28th, Decr. 5th & 12th 1790.
In 1812, she became the Matron of her Husbands' school.
DEATH: She died at Crosstones Vicarage, near Todmordon, Nr Halifax.   
picture Jane BRANWELL       Individual Information

          Birth: 1773 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
        Baptism: 29 Nov 1773 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
          Death: May 1855 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
         Burial: 12 May 1855 - Penzance St Mary, Cornwall, England
 

Parents

         Father: Thomas BRANWELL {3309} (Abt 1746-1808)
         Mother: Ann CARNE {3310} (Abt 1744-1809)

Spouses and Children

1. *John KINGSTON {4626} (1769 -       )
       Marriage: 12 Jun 1800 - Madron, Cornwall, England
   Mar. User ID: 1433
                 
       Children:
                1. Thomas Branwell KINGSTON {10748} (1801-1855)
                2. Ann Branwell KINGSTON {10747} (1803-      )

General: GENERAL NOTES: BAPTISM: Date: 29-Nov 1773
Parish Or Reg District: Madron
Name:: Jane BRAMWELL
Sex: dau
Father Forename; Thomas
Notes: At Penzance.
MARRIAGE: Date: 12-Jun 1800
Parish Or Reg District: Madron
Groom Name: John KINGSTON
Groom Residence: Town of Penzance
Groom Condition: bachelor
Groom Signed / Marked (S/M): Signed
Bride Name: Jane BRANWELL
Bride Residence: Town of Penzance
Bride Condition: spinster
Bride Signed / Marked (S/M); Signed
Banns / Licence (B/L): Licence
Witness 1: Elizth. BRANWELL
Witness 2: Thos. LONGLEY
Other Information: Licence dated June the 10th 1800.

DEATH: Death is recorded in the GRO indexes for the Penzance Registration District in the June quarter of 1855 under reference 5c 220.
BURIAL: Buried in Penzance St Mary. Age recorded as 81.
Date: 12-May 1855
Parish Or Reg District: Penzance, St. Mary (Madron Chapelry)
Name: Jane KINGSTON
Age: 81
Residence: Penzance

picture John Batten BRANWELL       Individual Information
          Birth: 1814 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
        Baptism: 6 May 1814 - Penzance, Cornwall, England
           
Parents

         Father: Benjamin Carne BRANWELL JP {3318} (1775-1818)
         Mother: Mary BATTEN {4623} (1777-1851)

General: GENERAL NOTES: BAPTISM: Date: 06-May 1814
Parish Or Reg District: Madron, Penzance Chapelry
Name: John Batten BRANWELL
Sex: son
Father Forename: Benjamin Carne
Mother Forename: Mary
Residence: Penzance
Father Rank Profession: gentleman & alderman of this town

picture John Bedford BRANWELL      Individual Information

          Birth: 28 Nov 1833 - Launceston, Cornwall, England
        Baptism: 8 Apr 1834 - Launceston, Cornwall, England
          
Parents
         Father: Joseph BRANWELL {1580} (1789-1857)
         Mother: Charlotte BRANWELL {3316} (1789-1848)

General:  
GENERAL NOTES: BAPTISM: Baptism Circuit: Launceston, Wesleyan Methodist
Name: John Bedford BRANWELL
Father Forename: Joseph
Mother Forename: Charlotte
Residence: Langor Parish Or Reg District St. Thomas
Father Rank Profession: Banker
Date: 08-Apr 1834
Age: born: 28 Nov 1833
argallfamilyworldwide

Kingston, Elizabeth Jane (1808–78) niece of Maria and Elizabeth Branwell, daughter of their sister Jane and her scapegrace Methodist husband John Kingston, whom she left when Elizabeth Jane was a baby. She was bequeathed one-fourth of Elizabeth Branwell’s money, as were all three of the Brontë sisters, the sum amounting to around £300 each. Charlotte wrote their co-heiress friendly and concerned letters in 1846, and Patrick apparently wrote to her as late as 1859. She died in poverty.

blackwellreference

Popular Bronte Videos

 
Today I was looking at this fil of the BBC
You can find here popular Bronte Videos

zondag 10 augustus 2014

Parsonage garden

''Life, believe, is not a dream
So dark as sages say;
Oft a little morning rain
Foretells a pleasant day.
Sometime there are clouds of gloom,
But these are transient all;
If the shower will make the roses bloom,
O why lament its fall?
Rapidly, merrily,
Life’s sunny hours flit by,
Gratefully, cheerily,
Enjoy them as they fly!' (CB)
From the e-newsletter :
July strikes me as “mid-term”. Spring with all its flourish has left us behind.  Those plants that straddle late spring and early summer such as honesty and columbine, have now been cut back. The early summer becomes history and the Summer Equinox has come and gone. Some flowers from that early summer period are still around such as roses, cranesbill and red campion but there is a need to be deadheading to encourage the last flowers from these specimens. The white roses still have their beautiful scent too. Even though the school holidays have just begun, to the gardener there is already the hint of autumn. Not only the deadheading but some leaves are beginning to fall, probably exaggerated by the dry weather. However, we need not despair just yet as there is still plenty of colour from many plants not least of all fushias and peonies with their beautiful shapes and colours. The garden has a particular dominant dual coloured hebe bush of profuse and contrasting lilac and white flowers.
 
In the back garden the vegetation as well as the flowering is prolific. Jenny has been very busy tending this area and we are now expecting a colourful show of yellow loosestrife and evening primrose. She recently rescued a struggling morning glory climbing plant (blue flowered with a bindweed like leaf) and re-planted it in the front garden in hopefully a more favourable location. Perhaps the back garden is becoming our nursery area!
Finally, a quick update on our Plant Bring and Buy held on a Sunday mid-month. We were very grateful to all those visitors who either swapped plants or donated. We enjoyed meeting with you and we hope you enjoyed the buns, cakes and cordials provided. We are currently thinking of how to use the funds to further enhance the garden.

donderdag 7 augustus 2014

Bronte enthusiasts hail ‘fantastic discovery’ of Wuthering Heights film script

FILM script used by the director of the first adaptation of Wuthering Heights has been bought for a five-figure sum by the Brontë Parsonage which hailed it as a “fantastic discovery”.

Made in the 1920s, using locations around Haworth, the film was made by the Ideal Film Company and was the first ever adaptation of Emily Brontë novel.
However, no survivig copy of the film has been found, despite many enquiries over the years by the Brontë Parsonage.
The script, bought from a book dealer in West Sussex, was used by the director Arthur Victor Bramble and contains 22 pages of production notes including his annotations, along with details of costumes and locations used in each scene and press cuttings.
There are original stills of the film crew carrying their equipment and shots of the child actors.
Ann Dinsdale, collections manager at the Brontë Parsonage, said: “It has taken several years to even come close to finding out whether a copy of the film existed, and so to now be in ownership of this incredible script is a fantastic and overwhelming triumph. It’s such an iconic film and a great effort was made to ensure the film’s authenticity with locations set in the Haworth area and telling the whole story. It’s a great loss that this classic film has not survived, but this is a great start in establishing its history.”
The script will go on display in the Brontë Parsonage Museum early next year. yorkshirepost

dinsdag 5 augustus 2014

Clough House, Halifax Road, Hightown, Liversedge

 
Patrick Bronte first came as minister to St Peter's Church, Hartshead from Dewsbury in 1810. At first he lodged at Thornbush Farm, known in those days as Lousy Thorn Farm, at Windybank Hightown (picture next to Patrick Bronte). He moved to Clough House, Halifax Road, Hightown (pictured above), on his marriage to Maria Branwell in 1812. The most  famous Brontes were born after the family moved to Thornton, Bradford in 1815. Charlotte (pictured above left) was born there in April 1816.

He was at Clough House when the croppers banded together to try to destroy the cropping machines being installed in the large mills. They called themselves Luddites, and met at the Shears inn in Halifax Road to plan the attack.

Despite arriving at Hartshead Church (now St Peter’s) in 1810, Patrick wasn’t officially inducted until July of the following year. He was incumbent there until 1815 when he exchanged parishes with the vicar of Thornton in Bradford. spenboroughguardian

A DOOR which once graced the Spen residence of the Rev Patrick Bronte has found a new home in Dewsbury Minster. 2004
The front door, which is at least two centuries old, was in place at Clough House, Halifax Road, Hightown, until about five years ago.  However, its condition had deteriorated so much it had to be removed, though it has been kept in storage at the listed building ever since. Some time ago the owner, Mrs Mary Crowther, offered it to the Bronte Society, who found a suitable home for it at Dewsbury MInster. Imelda Marsden, from the Society, said: "I'm really delighted because it is going back to where Patrick preached. This door has seen a lot of history and the Luddites would have walked past it. I'm thrilled we have found a home for it." dewsburyreporter

-----------------------------------------

HARTSHEAD, to which living Patrick was presented July 20th, 1810, by the Rev. John Buckworth, vicar of Dewsbury, is a small hamlet situated on a commanding eminence overlooking Calderdale, about four miles west of Dewsbury. Hartshead has now been created a parish, but up till a comparatively recent date, it was a chapelry in the parish of Dewsbury, the gift of the living being, as it is at the present day, in the hands of the vicar of Dewsbury. When Bronte came here, there was no parsonage house, so he put up, after his marriage, at a tall house at the top of Clough Lane, in Hightown, a neighbouring hamlet in the parish of Birstall. No doubt all round this commanding height the eye could range for many miles over an open, well wooded and well watered

The Eev. Patrick Bronte entered on his incumbency here on July 20th, 1810. He remained at Hartshead for five years, during which time he became deservedly popular as a preacher, so much so that when he exchanged with the Eev. Thomas Atkinson, incumbent of Thornton, the Hightown folks used often to walk over on a Sunday to hear their old clergyman preach. Mrs. Gaskell tells us that daring his stay here he was reputed as being a " very handsome fellow, full of Irish enthusiasm, and with something of an Irishman's capability of falling easily in love."


Hartshead Churcli, dedicated to St. Peter, with its weather-beaten Norman tower, and its old yew tree
is well worth a careful study. When the second Earl of Warren granted the living of Dewsbury to the priory of Lewes, this church was then in existence, that is, about 1120. It has been restored quite recently, but it still retains its Norman characte-
ristics in a striking manner. Its doorway and chancel arch, although not so highly adorned as the church at Adel, are well worthy of inspection. The old candelabrum of brass suspended from the ceiling, the finely carved reredos, and the quaint stained windows in great part erected to commemorate members of the Armytage family buried here, all take one's attention. The Armytage vault with their crest, a hand grasping a dagger, and the motto " Semper paratus," is seen in the floor of the church. In the vestry, Patrick Bronte's minute signature can be inspected in the register books which date back as far as 1612. The churchyard has nothing very notable in it. The oldest stone is one to the memory of the Hilleley family of Clifton, and bears the date 1614. archive/brontecountry

maandag 4 augustus 2014

Grandparents

Patrick Bronte married Maria BRANWELL in 1812.  Maria was born in 1783 in Penzance, Cornwall, the daughter of Thomas BRANWELL and Anne CARNE. She was one of 12 children, though only six of these survived childhood. Her siblings were Anne (1769-1792), Margaret (1770), Thomas (1771-?), Elisabeth (1772-1772), Jane (1773-1855), Benjamin Carne (1775-1818), Elisabeth (1776-1842), Thomas (1778-1779), Alice (1780-1780s), Margaret (1789) and Charlotte (1791-1848).

Anne CARNE was the wife of Thomas CRANWELL and the maternal grandmother of the Bronte sisters.  The CARNE name is quite numerous in Cornwall, but it seems likely that she is the Anne CARNE who was baptized in Penzance on 27th April 1744, the daughter of John Carne.  However, I cannot find any definite siblings for her, so any connection to this family would probably be further back.

The family was very successful in the import and export trade, and her father owned a brewery, an inn, and the largest grocers emporium in the town. The close-knit family was broken up by the death of Thomas Branwell in 1808 and of his wife the next year.

The builder of Nr 25 Chapel Street is known;
Richard Branwell and his partner Edward Hamilton in 1767, for Thomas Branwell and daughter-in law Ann (nee Carne),  as a wedding present.

Nr 25 Chapel street, Penzance . Owned and occupied by Thomas Branwell and Ann Carne married 28th November 1768. Thomas died 5th April 1808 age 62; Ann died 19th December 1809 aged 66. Said to have had 11 children, eight girls and three boys, seven of the children survived. The house was empty by 1815.
picturepenzance
 
 


Anne Branwell (Carne)

Datum van Geboorte
Overlijden
Overleden in Penzance, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom
Begraafplaats:
St Mary's Churchyard, Penzance, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom
 
  
Minnie's father Francis (Frank) Carne was a Carpenter from Madron in Cornwall, and a descendant of
          Henry Carne who was born in 1678  and also lived in Madron.  Henry was Minnie's 4th Great Grandfather.
          He was also the Grandfather of Anne Carne born in 1744 who married Thomas Branwell in Penzance theroyalzanettos
 
 

Opening Bronte Parsonage Museum

The Parsonage was officially presented to the Brontë Society and opened to the public as the Brontë Parsonage Museum on this day in 1928.
 
I never saw this picture before, I love it
Another picture and background information
you can find on
 

woensdag 30 juli 2014

Emily Jane Brontë was born on this day in 1818, in Thornton, West Yorkshire.

Bronte Parsonage Museum
Here  a few snaps from the event on Sunday celebrating the anniversary of Emily Bronte's Birthday! You can see the cake we all enjoyed which was decorated with heather from Emily's beloved moor!
 

woensdag 23 juli 2014

Temperance reformation and Catholic Emancipation.

Although a strong Tory Patrick Bronte was sympathetic to many Whig ideas. He supported Roman Catholic Emancipation, was against the death penalty for minor crimes, like stealing a loaf of bread, against the workhouse system where families were separated, a man from his wife and parents from their children, and against rotten boroughs where the few voters were bribed to vote for particular members of Parliament. Patrick was one of the few Tories in Haworth, a great believer in the established (Church of England) church among a majority of Dissenters. In Haworth he was a founder member, as was Branwell, of the Haworth Temperance Society.  He was a great believer in education and fought hard to raise money for, first of all a Sunday School and later a day school. He raised money for the poor when there was little work. He raised a subscription to replace the three bells of the church by six new ones so the bell ringers could take part in competitions. brusselsbronte 

Temperance reformation
During 1830, at the beginning of the temperance reformation, twenty temperance societies were founded, totalling between two and three thousand members. The first period of the temperance movement was focused on controlling drunkenness rather than abolishing all alcoholic beverages. history/journal

This photograph proudly displayed alongside other Brontë mementos at the Temperance tea rooms in the family's home village of Haworth in West Yorkshire, the picture was auctioned by Sotheby's in 1898 when the Museum of Brontë Relics closed down and sold off everything it owned. It has not been seen since, although copies of the picture are known to exist. independent

Catholic emancipation

Catholic emancipation was the subject of political debate in the United Kingdom, which intensified in the 19th Century after the Act of Union in 1801. Catholics were not allowed to sit in Parliament1 and therefore were represented by Protestants. Catholic emancipation — Catholic relief — was designed to give Catholics the right to sit in Parliament.

O'Connel

In 1823,
Daniel O'Connell, an Irish Catholic lawyer and politician, began a campaign for Catholic emancipation. He was widely successful and raised a great deal of money through 'Catholic Rent', a subscription to an association which cost only one penny a month. His popularity led to his election for the county of Clare in Ireland, even though he could not take his seat in Parliament. Robert Peel and the Duke of Wellington felt that the threat of insurrection in Ireland surpassed the threat of allowing Catholics to sit in Parliament4. The Catholic Relief Act was passed on 24 March, 1829. It contained a number of securities for the Protestants, including not allowing Catholics to attain certain positions and disenfranchising the 40-shilling freeholders. This meant that people who owned or lived on property worth more than forty shillings had previously been allowed to vote in Ireland, but that the property requirement would now be ten pounds.

Opposition to Catholic Emancipation
The Duke of Wellington, famous for his successes in the Napoleonic Wars, was the Prime Minister of Britain from 1828 - 1830 and the leader of the Tory party, which generally stood for the defence of the status quo. Both Wellington and his second-in-command and future Prime Minister Robert Peel had been against Catholic emancipation in the past, and their about-turn was seen as deceitful and disloyal. Wellington and Peel were of the opinion that the potential unrest in Ireland was preventable only by allowing Catholic emancipation. Many members of their own party opposed the measure, which was only passed with Whig support. The Duke of Newcastle was a strong opponent of Catholic emancipation, and in his diary described how Wellington and Peel 'betrayed their country'. He also attributes this speech to the Duke of Cumberland:

Nothing shall induce me to abandon the principles which I have always maintained and what is more to do my utmost to defeat measures which in my conscience I believe to be destructive of the Throne, the altar and the Protestant Constitution.
The opposition to Wellington and Peel's Catholic emancipation split the Tory party and led to the Whigs taking power for the first time in more than twenty years.
bbc.co.uk

Parsonage

Parsonage

Charlotte Bronte

Presently the door opened, and in came a superannuated mastiff, followed by an old gentleman very like Miss Bronte, who shook hands with us, and then went to call his daughter. A long interval, during which we coaxed the old dog, and looked at a picture of Miss Bronte, by Richmond, the solitary ornament of the room, looking strangely out of place on the bare walls, and at the books on the little shelves, most of them evidently the gift of the authors since Miss Bronte's celebrity. Presently she came in, and welcomed us very kindly, and took me upstairs to take off my bonnet, and herself brought me water and towels. The uncarpeted stone stairs and floors, the old drawers propped on wood, were all scrupulously clean and neat. When we went into the parlour again, we began talking very comfortably, when the door opened and Mr. Bronte looked in; seeing his daughter there, I suppose he thought it was all right, and he retreated to his study on the opposite side of the passage; presently emerging again to bring W---- a country newspaper. This was his last appearance till we went. Miss Bronte spoke with the greatest warmth of Miss Martineau, and of the good she had gained from her. Well! we talked about various things; the character of the people, - about her solitude, etc., till she left the room to help about dinner, I suppose, for she did not return for an age. The old dog had vanished; a fat curly-haired dog honoured us with his company for some time, but finally manifested a wish to get out, so we were left alone. At last she returned, followed by the maid and dinner, which made us all more comfortable; and we had some very pleasant conversation, in the midst of which time passed quicker than we supposed, for at last W---- found that it was half-past three, and we had fourteen or fifteen miles before us. So we hurried off, having obtained from her a promise to pay us a visit in the spring... ------------------- "She cannot see well, and does little beside knitting. The way she weakened her eyesight was this: When she was sixteen or seventeen, she wanted much to draw; and she copied nimini-pimini copper-plate engravings out of annuals, ('stippling,' don't the artists call it?) every little point put in, till at the end of six months she had produced an exquisitely faithful copy of the engraving. She wanted to learn to express her ideas by drawing. After she had tried to draw stories, and not succeeded, she took the better mode of writing; but in so small a hand, that it is almost impossible to decipher what she wrote at this time.

I asked her whether she had ever taken opium, as the description given of its effects in Villette was so exactly like what I had experienced, - vivid and exaggerated presence of objects, of which the outlines were indistinct, or lost in golden mist, etc. She replied, that she had never, to her knowledge, taken a grain of it in any shape, but that she had followed the process she always adopted when she had to describe anything which had not fallen within her own experience; she had thought intently on it for many and many a night before falling to sleep, - wondering what it was like, or how it would be, - till at length, sometimes after the progress of her story had been arrested at this one point for weeks, she wakened up in the morning with all clear before her, as if she had in reality gone through the experience, and then could describe it, word for word, as it had happened. I cannot account for this psychologically; I only am sure that it was so, because she said it. ----------------------She thought much of her duty, and had loftier and clearer notions of it than most people, and held fast to them with more success. It was done, it seems to me, with much more difficulty than people have of stronger nerves, and better fortunes. All her life was but labour and pain; and she never threw down the burden for the sake of present pleasure. I don't know what use you can make of all I have said. I have written it with the strong desire to obtain appreciation for her. Yet, what does it matter? She herself appealed to the world's judgement for her use of some of the faculties she had, - not the best, - but still the only ones she could turn to strangers' benefit. They heartily, greedily enjoyed the fruits of her labours, and then found out she was much to be blamed for possessing such faculties. Why ask for a judgement on her from such a world?" elizabeth gaskell/charlotte bronte



Poem: No coward soul is mine

No coward soul is mine,
No trembler in the worlds storm-troubled sphere:
I see Heavens glories shine,
And faith shines equal, arming me from fear.


O God within my breast.
Almighty, ever-present Deity!
Life -- that in me has rest,
As I -- Undying Life -- have power in Thee!


Vain are the thousand creeds
That move mens hearts: unutterably vain;
Worthless as withered weeds,
Or idlest froth amid the boundless main,


To waken doubt in one
Holding so fast by Thine infinity;
So surely anchored on
The steadfast Rock of immortality.


With wide-embracing love
Thy Spirit animates eternal years,
Pervades and broods above,
Changes, sustains, dissolves, creates, and rears.


Though earth and man were gone,
And suns and universes ceased to be,
And Thou wert left alone,
Every existence would exist in Thee.


There is not room for Death,
Nor atom that his might could render void:
Thou -- Thou art Being and Breath,
And what Thou art may never be destroyed.


--
Emily Bronte

Family tree

The Bronte Family

Grandparents - paternal
Hugh Brunty was born 1755 and died circa 1808. He married Eleanor McClory, known as Alice in 1776.

Grandparents - maternal
Thomas Branwell (born 1746 died 5th April 1808) was married in 1768 to Anne Carne (baptised 27th April 1744 and died 19th December 1809).

Parents
Father was Patrick Bronte, the eldest of 10 children born to Hugh Brunty and Eleanor (Alice) McClory. He was born 17th March 1777 and died on 7th June 1861. Mother was Maria Branwell, who was born on 15th April 1783 and died on 15th September 1821.

Maria had a sister, Elizabeth who was known as Aunt Branwell. She was born in 1776 and died on 29th October 1842.

Patrick Bronte married Maria Branwell on 29th December 1812.

The Bronte Children
Patrick and Maria Bronte had six children.
The first child was Maria, who was born in 1814 and died on 6th June 1825.
The second daughter, Elizabeth was born on 8th February 1815 and died shortly after Maria on 15th June 1825. Charlotte was the third daughter, born on 21st April 1816.

Charlotte married Arthur Bell Nicholls (born 1818) on 29th June 1854. Charlotte died on 31st March 1855. Arthur lived until 2nd December 1906.

The first and only son born to Patrick and Maria was Patrick Branwell, who was born on 26th June 1817 and died on 24th September 1848.

Emily Jane, the fourth daughter was born on 30th July 1818 and died on 19th December 1848.

The sixth and last child was Anne, born on 17th January 1820 who died on 28th May 1849.

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